Video #1: Curve Master Troubleshooting

This video describes user errors which can result in less than perfect results.  If you find you have excess fabric at the end of a seam, this video can explain how this happened and get you better results.  Click here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afnM94zFaQU&feature=youtube_gdata_player

4 Comments

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4 responses to “Video #1: Curve Master Troubleshooting

  1. Sandy Brown

    I am trying to appliqué a Dresden plate to a large peace of fabric. Help!

    • In general, the Curve Master Presser Foot is intended only for sewing 1/4″ (or 5/8″) seam allowances and not intended for applique or topstitching because of the pressure the far right edge of the Foot applies to the machine throat plate. That said, if your sewing machine allows you to greatly DECREASE the downward pressure on the Presser Foot, you may perhaps be able to then move the fabrics. Also, the needle hole of the Curve Master is intended to be small enough to enhance straight stitching by optionally using a single-hole stitch plate, which means that only a very narrow zig-zag stitch can be accommodated. Generally for applique I recommend a short-toed open-toed foot.

  2. Christina Wilson

    Does anyone have a problems using the curve master foot on viking D2 machine with getting less than 1/4 inch seam, less than a scant 1/4 seam.
    it appears to me that the foot moves towards the right on the bar where snaps on?
    any help anyone can give me would be greatly apphreciated!
    Chris Wilson

    • On some Vikings the metal bar of the Curve Master is smallish and the foot can “slide” sideways. The solution is to 1) leave it “moveable” and decide for the project what seam allowance you want and then periodically check to be sure the Curve Master is in the proper place; or 2) decide what seam allowance you want and then place a tiny spot of super glue on the “slack” area (with the foot OFF the machine) let it dry and that will act as a stopper to keep the foot from sliding. This can actually be a good thing! Thanks for writing.

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